From Bench to Bedside and Back to Bench: Translating Science into Meaningful Outcomes for Patients 

May 31, 2017

I

mmuno-Oncology (I-O) research is quickly evolving, with new advances that bring us closer to precision cancer treatment. Translational medicine – research to further our understanding of cancer biology and to identify the patient populations most likely to derive benefit from I-O therapy – is a driving force behind these discoveries and is playing an increasingly important role in cancer research.

Translational medicine encompasses many different areas of basic research. Our interdisciplinary teams are working together to answer key questions and more intimately understand the interplay between the immune system and cancer. 

Here, members of our translational medicine team share more about their work and the important role translational medicine will play in the future of oncology treatment:

Pathology:

Hear from Mike Montalto, head of translational pathology & biomarker technologies, about how translational pathology, immunohistochemistry, clinical genomics and genetics, and clinical flow cytometry are being used in cancer research

Experimental Research

Hear from Steve Nadler, head of exploratory translational research, about his team’s work to dissect the human pathophysiology of disease

Clinical Pharmacology & Pharmacometrics

Hear from Tarek Leil, head of Quantitative Clinical Pharmacology, about an emerging innovative discipline that uses mathematical mechanistic models; and Tunde Bello, head of Clinical Pharmacology & Pharmacometrics, and his research into the behavior of drugs in the body

Immune Biomarkers in Oncology Research

Hear from Jean-Marie Bruey, head of oncology biomarkers, about our research into disease biology and predictive biomarkers  

Leveraging Bioinformatics

Hear from Joe Szustakowski, head of translational bioinformatics, about how his team uses raw data and distills that into a useful biological signals.

Right Treatment, Right Patient, Right Time

Through our research into the tumor microenvironment, we are learning more about how a patient’s dynamic tumor biology can be used as a guide for treatment decisions throughout his or her cancer journey. We continue to investigate the role of PD-L1 tumor mutational burden , and gene signatures of inflammation, and other potentially predictive biomarkers – both tumor and peripheral biomarkers – to better inform and predict the benefit of current and future approaches. Additionally, our teams continue to evaluate potential diagnostic tools to help identify those biomarkers in patients leveraging less-invasive methods such as liquid biopsy.

To learn more about how BMS is exploring the research behind why some people respond to immunotherapy and others do not, click here