Ryan Moslin, Ph.D.

Ryan Moslin, Ph.D.

Senior Research Investigator

Early Immunology Discovery

Biography

Ryan Moslin is one of Bristol-Myers Squibb’s medicinal chemists. This team of scientists uses their knowledge of chemistry, biology and physiology to try to discover new treatments for diseases and other health problems.

 

As a senior research investigator, Ryan works to develop small molecule therapies that will potentially treat immune-mediated diseases, which are illnesses often rooted in inflammation and can include cancer and arthritis. For the past five years, Ryan has been instrumental in the discovery and development of an investigational treatment for plaque psoriasis, a condition that he himself lives with today.

 

“I think chemists in general are attracted to challenges, even unsolvable challenges. Some of us - and I see it with my coworkers - leap at the chance to do the hardest things,” Ryan explains. “I think you'll find most chemists don't believe there is anything that is unsolvable.”

 

By becoming a chemist for a biopharmaceutical company, Ryan broke with a family tradition going back many generations of pursuing a career in teaching. Prior to joining Bristol-Myers Squibb, Ryan worked as a post-doctoral associate at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), where he studied materials science. He receive a Ph.D. in organic chemistry from MIT, following a B.S. in honors chemistry from the University of British Columbia.

 

Ryan has been an author or presenter on over 20 presentations, patents and publications.

 

Watch video featuring Ryan:

Daughters & Data 

Interests and Expertise

Having served as the co-chair of programs in early-phase immuno-oncology and immunology drug discovery at Bristol-Myers Squibb, Ryan spends the bulk of his time uncovering new ways to modulate the immune system to treat disease. As a medicinal chemist, Ryan uses his chemistry background to design and build new compounds, including small molecules.

 

Ryan balances his work as a scientist with his role as a father and husband. He says the idea that he could discover a medicine that could help the next generation is part of the reason he enjoys coming to work every day.

 

“You come to work for the next generation, or more specifically, your next generation,” Ryan explains. “It’s the idea that you can help, if not your child, then someone else's child, even 10 years down the road; and that someone else is working on something that may help my child.”

 

When not in the lab, he enjoys spending time with his wife and two daughters at their home in New Jersey, including assisting his girls with their homework or watching them play hockey or flag football.